Setting up IPv6 with Telus PureFibre on a Ubiquiti UniFi Dream Machine

I recently got a Ubiquiti UniFi Dream Machine (UDM) to support gigabit-speed internet at my new apartment. The UniFi line is a significant step up from consumer home routers, providing better customizability and management options for networks.

The following settings are required to get IPv6 working locally using Telus PureFibre internet:

In the Network application, go to Settings -> Internet -> WAN. Expand the Advanced section, then expand the IPv6 Connection subsection. Set the following settings:

  • IPv6 Connection: DHCPv6
  • Prefix Delegation Size: 56

Apply the changes at the bottom.

Then go to the Networks section and open your LAN network. Expand the Advanced section and scroll down to the IPv6 options, and set the following values:

  • IPv6 Interface Type: Prefix Delegation
  • IPv6 RA: Enabled
  • The rest can be the default values.

Apply the changes.

The next time you reconnect to the network, you should see your computer be given an IPv6 address. You can use sites like ipv6-test.com to test your IPv6 connectivity.

Wi-Fi everywhere!

Over the past year, more and more ShawOpen Wi-Fi hotspots have been popping up everywhere around Metro Vancouver.

This is incredibly useful for Shaw customers (like me) because it’s so easy to find reliable Wi-Fi access anywhere we go.  If you’re a Shaw internet customer, you get to save several devices so that they can automatically connect to the network without having to login through the portal.

Telus is starting to form their own network as well, under the names #TELUS and #TELUSDirect.  The one advantage they have is that for Telus customers, #TELUSDirect is a secured Wi-Fi network, whereas ShawOpen is an open unsecured network.

I’m hoping that Shaw will consider providing a secure network for customers, but until then we’ll have to use our own VPN services to secure the Wi-Fi connection.

Google Chrome

Google is releasing a beta of its browser application, Google Chrome, finally.  The scheduled release date is tomorrow (Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008).

Google Chrome uses the WebKit rendering engine, which is currently being used in Apple’s Safari browser among others.  I personally prefer Safari’s speed at loading pages, and I hope Google Chrome using the same engine can achieve same or better speeds than Firefox or Internet Explorer.

Also it seems like each tab in Google Chrome will be run in its own process, which should make memory leaks easier to manage (well hopefully there won’t be any to start off with).

The Google Chrome team put together a comic book outlining the development for this browser.  Very interesting read.

Google Blogoscoped has a post on Google Chrome quickly listing a few features and also another post with screenshots of the new browser.  Google’s official blog also has a post mainly for announcing Google Chrome’s release date.  Yet another post on All Things Digital discusses Google’s tactical moves invading the browser market.