Synology Hyper Backup Options and Pricing

The Synology Hyper Backup app allows owners of Synology NAS devices to easily set up backups to various cloud services.  However, one thing that isn’t shown in the app is the pricing of each service.  So here’s a pricing comparison (prices as of Aug 4, 2018).

  • Synology C2
    • Location: Frankfurt, Germany
    • 100 GB = €9.99/year (approx. USD $0.0100/GB/month)
    • 300 GB = €24.99/year (approx. USD $0.0081/GB/month)
    • 1 TB = €59.99/year (approx. USD $0.0058/GB/month)
    • 1+ TB = €69.99/TB/year (approx. USD $0.0068/GB/month)
  • Amazon S3
    • Location: Many, using U.S. (N. Virginia) to compare
    • Pricing: Complicated – only comparing standard S3 storage costs here
    • USD $0.023/GB/month (first 50TB)
  • Amazon Glacier – not supported in Hyper Backup, but there is a Glacier-specific app that can do this
    • Location: Many, using U.S. (N. Virginia) to compare
    • Pricing: Complicated – only comparing storage costs here
    • USD $0.0040/GB/month
  • Microsoft Azure
    • Location: Many, using US West 2 to compare
    • Pricing: Complicated – only comparing storage costs here
    • USD $0.0184/GB/month (first 50TB)
  • IBM (SoftLayer) Cloud
    • Location: Many, using US – East to compare
    • Pricing: Complicated – only comparing storage costs here
    • USD $0.0220/GB/month (first 500TB)
  • Rackspace
    • Didn’t have time to figure this out, but looked more expensive than the other options.
  • Amazon Drive
    • 100 GB = USD $11.99/year (approx. USD $0.0100/GB/month)
    • 1 TB = USD $59.99/year (approx. USD $0.0050/GB/month)
  • Dropbox
    • 1 TB = USD $99/year (approx. USD $0.0083/GB/month)
    • 2 TB = USD $199/year (approx. USD $0.0083/GB/month)
  • Google Drive
    • 100 GB = USD $19.99/year (approx. USD $0.0167GB/month)
    • 1 TB = USD $99.99/year (approx. USD $0.0083/GB/month)
  • hubiC
    • Location: Gravelines, France
    • 100 GB = €10/year (approx. USD $0.0097/GB/month)
    • 10 TB = €50/year (approx. USD $0.0005/GB/month)
  • HiDrive
    • Location: Germany
    • 100 GB = €5.80/month (approx. USD $0.0672/GB/month)
    • 500 GB = €12.52/month (approx. USD $0.029/GB/month)
  • SFR NAS backup
    • French website, didn’t translate to find out
  • HiCloud S3
    • Location: Taiwan
    • Pricing: Complicated – only comparing storage costs here
    • TWD $0.75/GB/month (approx. USD $0.025/GB/month)
  • Backblaze B2
    • Not supported by Hyper Backup, but can “sync” through Cloud Sync
    • USD $0.005/GB/month

Enterphone intercom anywhere

My apartment building has an old hard-wired Enterphone intercom to buzz visitors in.  This poses a slight annoyance since the dependency of the phone line in conjunction with a conventional corded telephone means I have to walk to the phone in order to answer the intercom.

Given the low rate of visitors and the small size of my apartment, in retrospect, this isn’t really a big deal.  Most normal people would just buy a cheap cordless phone and call it a day.

But that only helps if I’m in the apartment.  What if I wanted to be able to buzz myself in if I somehow got locked out?

Continue reading “Enterphone intercom anywhere”

Delaying a MacBook Pro’s deep sleep

I bought a new mid-2012 non-Retina MacBook Pro late last year, immediately prior to the line being discontinued (I still think the second-generation MacBook Pros were the best series).  After about a week, I found an annoying thing with it:  When I turned on the computer after coming back from work, it seemed like it almost always required a cold startup after sleeping, where the optical drive initialized and did its buzz, and took a lengthy 10-15 seconds to wake up from sleep.  Also, the computer would wake up (and the optical drive buzzed) even if the MagSafe charger was disconnected.

I contemplated bringing it into the Apple store, as this behaviour was not exhibited in my mid-2009 model and the optical drive buzzing was plain annoying; I thought there was something wrong with my Mac specifically.

However, from a bit of searching it turned out that this was a “feature” of the Mac since OS X Mountain Lion for 2012 Macs and newer: Continue reading “Delaying a MacBook Pro’s deep sleep”

Basic ‘ZFS on Linux’ setup on CentOS 7

Here is a quick guide to getting a plain ZFS partition working on a Linux machine using the “ZFS on Linux” project.  I was playing around on a CentOS 7 virtual machine trying to set it up as a replication target for my home FreeNAS box as a backup.  If you are unfamiliar with ZFS, it is a filesystem for a storage environment, having features such as data integrity protection and snapshots; I came across it as it is used in FreeNAS.

Here is the procedure I used:

Continue reading “Basic ‘ZFS on Linux’ setup on CentOS 7”

VMware ESXi Scratch Space

If you installed VMware ESXi on a USB stick like I did, the “scratch space” (used for storing logs and debug information) is stored on a RAM disk.  This takes up 512MB of memory that could otherwise be provisioned to virtual machines.  In addition, it does not persist across reboots, which explains why I was never able to find any logs after a crash. Also I was seeing random “No space left on device” errors when I was trying to run the munin monitoring script for ESXi.

The solution to this is to simply create a folder on a disk, and configure ESXi to use it.

  1. Login to the console or SSH to the host.
  2. Go into one of your datastores in /vmfs/volumes/
  3. Create a directory for the scratch space.
  4. Login to the vSphere Client.
  5. In the Host device, go to the Configuration tab, then find the Software category on the left menu and click Advanced Settings
  6. In the Configuration parameters window, find ScratchConfig on the left.
  7. For the “ScratchConfig.ConfiguredScratchLocation” box, enter the path to the folder you created in step 3.
    ESXi Advanced Settings Window
  8. Reboot the host.

It’s as simple as that!

References: